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Malezi Centre Story

Malezi Centre Story

A primary school and community center creating change in one of Nairobi's most challenged slums.

Location: Kitui Ndogo Slum, Nairobi, Kenya

THE KITUI NDOGO SLUM, home to an estimated 50,000 residents, many of who survive on less than $1 USD/day, is situated 15-minutes to the east of Nairobi's bustling city center in the gritty Eastleigh district. Its entrance lies at the intersection of Muinami and Digo St.

The slum is located opposite a contrasted middle class housing complex, footsteps from the towering Masjid Noor Mosque, which is rumored to be a recruiting center for the Somali-based al-Shabaab militant group. A highly polluted Nairobi river, doubling as waste refuge, flows through this densely populated maze of crudely constructed, dilapidated structures fashioned out of corrugated iron sheets and mud.

The poverty in Kitui is borderline hopeless and the security threats real. Eastleigh floats in and out of the UK's no-go zone for foreigners, as kidnappings for ransom can occur, as well as grenade attacks. Kitui is plagued by crime, violence, prostitution, and drug and alcohol abuse given how harsh life is and the extreme level of poverty—and there is little hope of relief in sight.

   The highly polluted Nairobi river flows through the Kitui Ndogo slum.     Photo: Unni Raveendranathen

The highly polluted Nairobi river flows through the Kitui Ndogo slum. Photo: Unni Raveendranathen

Less than a handful of NGOs work in the slum due to its hazardous sanitation problems, security issues, and its relatively small size (it competes for attention with Nairobi's infamous Kibera slum where thousands of NGOs operate). It is likewise neglected by the local government administration, which does not have the resources nor willpower to address the numerous, complex challenges facing residents of this community.

What Can Be Done?

The question is best answered through the story of Kitui Ndogo community leader, Teacher Grace Kavoi.

Historically, children growing up in the slum have not been able to go to school, as 100% free schooling is as yet not provided by the Kenyan government. Since parents can't afford private school fees and often haven't been educated themselves (and, understandably, don't fully grasp the value of an education) the vast majority of kids sit outside all day unattended by their parents — single mothers, usually — who go looking for work to put food on the table. Their all too likely fate is to succumb to the negative influence of the environment and repeat the cycle of poverty.

No child who sincerely wanted to learn was turned away.
— Teacher Grace Kavoi

In 1998, following a call to be of service to these vulnerable and needy children, Teacher Grace Kavoi decided to start a free daycare program for them, which she would end up calling Malezi, meaning "to care for/nurture" in Kiswahili. 

Teacher Grace, as she is known to her students, started Malezi in her tiny home with just two students teaching basic education. As more students enrolled, she ended up renting a 10'x10' building with no windows and no electricity and started teaching the formal government curriculum. Attracted to her dynamism and because of her growing role in the community as a leader, over the years, Grace would eventually receive more students than the space could accommodate, well over 60.

All expenses for Malezi have been funded almost entirely out of Grace's own pocket, as she never asked for fees from her students. In 2008, she started receiving organizational and financial support from the Centre for Partnership and Civic Engagement Trust (CEPACET), a local NGO, and in 2012, I got involved.

You can read more about Grace's story, in her own words, on the SmileBlog.

   The original Malezi Centre. Photo: Unni Raveendranathen

The original Malezi Centre. Photo: Unni Raveendranathen

The stories of impact and change Teacher Grace — true to her name — is responsible for are many.

She has inspired many of her students to pursue education despite their challenges, which has resulted in some even entering into college. More than that, she teaches the importance of a moral, responsible life and has altered the courses of lives headed for gangs, crime, and prostitution—creating a number of community volunteers and change agents who are following in her footsteps.

Additionally, Grace's sacrifice, dedication, and love for the community has had the effect of motivating parents and community members alike to care more about their lives. As a result, this one motivated woman is helping to create change in an environment where you would not think it to be possible.

What can be done? People can care, even when others don't. In faith, they can give great service from the heart and work hard without regard to their own immediate needs. Through this, change, even in the most desperate of circumstances, can come. That is the story of Malezi.

A New Malezi

Malezi is a platform for inspiring residents of Kitui Ndogo to be the change despite their real and significant poverty issues.

In 2012, I worked with CEPACET, Teacher Grace, as well as Kitui Ndogo's Chairman, Kilonso Abraham, to help facilitate the construction of a sewage system, which solved a hazardous sanitation issue that was endangering the lives of 6,000 residents. With this urgent task resolved, we were asked if anything could be done to upgrade Grace's overly crowded center to make room for additional students.

Agreeing to the project, we envisioned a large, two-story structure with enough classrooms to comfortably seat 200 children across the Primary School grade levels. For sustainability purposes, we intended to purchase the land the school would be built on to avoid a monthly rent payment, as well as invest in a 10,000 liter water tank to sell clean water to the neighboring residents for income (given most of the students would not be able to afford much in the way of school fees).

The cost to launch? More than $20,000.

After an 11.5 month fundraising journey I led in 2013, the necessary funds were raised. On Christmas Eve of the same year, a groundbreaking ceremony was held on the land, signaling the start of construction and a new chapter for the children and residents of the Kitui Ndogo slum.

The new and improved Malezi School and Community Centre was officially inaugurated on 28 January 2014 in the presence of parents, students, community members and leaders, as well as representatives from the local government administration.

   Breaking ground on Christmas Eve, 2013.

Breaking ground on Christmas Eve, 2013.

   New Malezi Centre under construction.

New Malezi Centre under construction.

   Opening day and inauguration in 2014. Photo: Unni Raveendranathen

Opening day and inauguration in 2014. Photo: Unni Raveendranathen

   A water tank system for selling clean water to support the center's overhead.     Photo: Unni Raveendranathen

A water tank system for selling clean water to support the center's overhead. Photo: Unni Raveendranathen

   Eco-friendly toilets were installed to serve the center and community.

Eco-friendly toilets were installed to serve the center and community.

   Malezi symbolically color contrasted against the grey of the slum environment. Photo: Unni Raveendranathen

Malezi symbolically color contrasted against the grey of the slum environment. Photo: Unni Raveendranathen

Now, several years later, Malezi School has more than 200 students enrolled (up from approximately 60 at the relaunch). It has been expanded to include four new classrooms, allowing for each primary school grade to be offered, and so the possibility for students to graduate and enroll in secondary school. These are dreams, just a short while ago, that were deemed impossible.

A Platform for Change

Malezi began as a school but is growing into a center for community transformation, which is changing lives and gradually improving conditions in the slum. At the core then, Malezi is a platform for inspiring residents of Kitui Ndogo to be the change despite their real and significant poverty issues.

   Members of the Malezi Parents Initiative after the launch of their cake baking business.    

Members of the Malezi Parents Initiative after the launch of their cake baking business.
 

During an area survey, Malezi staff discovered that, "80% of the [Malezi students'] parents are poor single mothers and 20% (either the father or mother) are addicted to local brew or use drugs. Due to this, the parents are not able to take care of their children properly, including paying the little school fees of 350 Shillings ($3)/month."

In an effort to remedy this problem, the parents were invited to a meeting at the center so Malezi staff could better understand the challenges they were facing. During this meeting, under and unemployment was understood to be the most pressing concern and root cause for the substance use and promiscuity.

   Mama Sara preparing the popular "love" cakes.

Mama Sara preparing the popular "love" cakes.

For those willing to commit, an idea was proposed to start a collective chama (savings) program in order to save for the equipment necessary to start a small cake baking business, for which there is a viable market in the area and so the possibility of earning money in a dignified way. Out of the 40 parents who attended this meeting, 26 committed to the program. They named themselves MPI or the Malezi Parents Initiative and began the work ahead of them.

In addition to their own savings, the MPI members received outside support from LivingSmile supporters that enabled them to launch their "Upendo Café" well ahead of schedule. In addition to cakes, the café serves tea, as well as local snacks and staples. Though the group has a long way to go before each currently active member earns enough to subsist on, the café is meeting its monthly expenses and, at times, generates some profit.

This is how poverty is solved. Not only through creating viable income generating activities but, more importantly, by cultivating the right kind of values and commitment necessary to work through a challenge as a great as only earning $1/day with a family to feed.

Malezi has often been described as a "beam of light" in the community and we expect several other such stories to emerge, as its roots grow deeper.

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